Tips for Audio Recording

If you need to record an MP3 of a teleseminar or class, here are some tips to improve the quality of your recording:
Make sure you have a foam cover on your microphone, which will limit popping of the “p” sound.
Limit outside noise – don’t record when traffic outside your office is heavy, or when your neighbor is mowing the lawn.
Limit inside noise – send the dog out for a walk with someone, make sure your house is nice and quiet (or barricade yourself in the quietest room).
Limit echoes – don’t record in the bathroom. Even if it’s the quietest room.
Bookend with an introduction and conclusion that mention your website/brand if appropriate.
Test the sound a few times before going for the whole recording – listen for background noises you’ve missed, make sure you’re not breathing directly into the mic, etc.
If you’re doing a longer recording, consider breaking it up into sections and recording 1 at a time and then splicing together in software. You’ll be less likely to get voice fatigue.
Have water, Kleenex, all that sort of stuff nearby. Warm water helps me to recover my voice.
Consider recording while standing up to keep up your energy levels.
Do you have any other tips that you’d like to share? Do so in the comments! I’d love to know.

If you need to record an MP3 of a teleseminar or class, here are some tips to improve the quality of your recording:

  • Make sure you have a foam cover on your microphone, which will limit popping of the “p” sound.
  • Limit outside noise – don’t record when traffic outside your office is heavy, or when your neighbor is mowing the lawn.
  • Limit inside noise – send the dog out for a walk with someone, make sure your house is nice and quiet (or barricade yourself in the quietest room).
  • Limit echoes – don’t record in the bathroom. Even if it’s the quietest room.
  • Bookend with an introduction and conclusion that mention your website/brand if appropriate.
  • Test the sound a few times before going for the whole recording – listen for background noises you’ve missed, make sure you’re not breathing directly into the mic, etc.
  • If you’re doing a longer recording, consider breaking it up into sections and recording 1 at a time and then splicing together in software. You’ll be less likely to get voice fatigue.
  • Have water, Kleenex, all that sort of stuff nearby. Warm water helps me to recover my voice.
  • Consider recording while standing up to keep up your energy levels.

Do you have any other tips that you’d like to share? Do so in the comments! I’d love to know.

elf@elf-design.com' About Erin Ferree

Erin Ferree is a brand strategist and designer. She works with small businesses to create brands with substance and style that fit their businesses perfectly.
She's designed brands for hundreds of small business all over the world. Her brands help her clients attract their ideal clients, outshine their competition and make them unforgettable. She also works with small business owners to develop complete clarity about their brand positioning and to develop total brand clarity.
Her award-winning design work and her writing on design have been published in many books and periodicals.
Erin lives, cooks and plays tug-of-war with her dog Stanley in San Luis Obispo, California. Her website is http://www.brandstyledesign.com

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